Baking soda as a shampoo: your hair grows like magic!

Baking soda as a shampoo: your hair grows like magic!

Baking soda as a shampoo: your hair grows like magic!

The use of baking soda has been increased recently thanks to its healing power of many health problems. Baking soda can do a lot more than you imagine, among its benefits, it is used to improve the quality of hair. It not only

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cleanses and revitalizes the hair, but it will make you grow and strengthen the hair in an incredible way.
It is very beneficial to use baking soda for your hair instead of cleaning it regularly. Avoid using store-bought products containing harmful chemicals, but try this natural baking soda treatment to maintain the health of your hair and your scalp.
recipe:

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Ingredients:
1 part of baking soda
3 parts of water.
Mix the ingredients well in a small plastic bottle. Apply this combination on dry, wet hair. Massage well and leave on for 1 to 3 minutes and rinse well. After rinsing the hair, mix 1 part cider vinegar and 4 parts water and apply the mixture on your hair. To reduce the smell of vinegar, add a few drops of lavender, peppermint or rosemary oil. Tilt your head back and close your eyes and rinse your hair gently and carefully. It may be difficult to wash your hair without the shampoo foam but after a few days of treatment the results will surprise you.

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Guide Travel To Tangier

Guide Travel To Tangier

 

Tangier has long been romanticized by artists, Beat poets, and writers who have arrived at its busy shores seeking adventure. Tangier is the gateway to Africa for many travelers. Cruise ships often dock there on their way from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean, and travelers in Europe find it easy to take a quick ferry from Spain to the port of Tangier. (More about getting to Tangier below).


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While most visitors to Tangier come for a day, there are some lovely boutique hotels to stay at and once you figure out how to avoid some of the hustle, you’ll appreciate Tangier a lot more by spending a few days here.

What to See in Tangier
Tangier doesn’t have quite the offbeat charm it did in the 1940’s and 1950’s when you could rub shoulders with the likes of Truman Capote, Paul Bowles, and Tennessee Williams, but if you give it some time, and ignore the tourist touts, it will grow on you. Tangier is an interesting, cosmopolitan mix of African and European influences. It’s a port city and port cities are always rough around the edges. Tangier is not very pleasant at night.


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As with many cities in Morocco, there’s an old town (Medina) and a new town (Ville Nouvelle).

The Medina: Tangier’s Medina (old walled city) is a lively place, its alleyways are filled with shops, teahouses, and brothels (it’s a port city after all). Tourist trinkets are plentiful here, if this is your only stop in Morocco, buy away. But if you plan to continue traveling in Morocco, you’ll find better deals elsewhere.

 


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The American Legation: Morocco was the first nation to recognize American independence, and the USA established a diplomatic mission in Tangier in 1821. Now a museum, the American Legation is located in the southwest corner of the medina and worth a look. The museum houses some fascinating art including a room dedicated to Paul Bowles and works by Eugene Delacroix, Yves Saint Laurent, and James McBeay.

 

Place de France: The heart of ville nouvelle and the social focal point for the middle classes in Tangier. A good place to sip some tea and enjoy the sea view is the highly recommended Terrasse des Paresseux just east of the Place.

 

 

The Kasbah: The Kasbah is located high on a hill in Tangier with some good views of the ocean. The old Sultan’s palace (built in the 17th Century) lies within the Kasbah’s walls, is known as Dar El Makhzen and is now a museum that houses fine examples of Moroccan art.

 

Grand Socco: A large square at the main entrance of the medina is a busy transport hub and a good place to watch the chaos of traffic, carts, and people go about their daily routines.

 

Beaches: the beaches closest to town are rather dirty, as is the water. Find better beaches about 10km west, out of town

Getting to Tangier and Away
Tangier is just a short ferry ride from Spain and the gateway to the rest of Morocco whether you travel by bus or train.

Getting to Tangier from Spain (and Back)
Morocco lies just a short 9 miles from Spain. High-speed ferries can take just 30 (choppy) minutes to cross.

Algeciras (Spain) to Tangier (Morocco): Algeciras to Tangier is the most popular route to Morocco. High-speed ferries travel almost every hour, year-round and take around 30 minutes to cross. There are also slower ferries that are a little cheaper. A roundtrip ticket for a foot passenger, on a high-speed ferry, costs 37 Euros.

Tarifa (Spain) to Tangier (Morocco): High-Speed ferries leave every two hours from Spain’s windsurfing capital, Tarifa and take 35 minutes to get to Tangier. FRS offers good service on this route, a round-trip adult ticket sets you back around 37 Euros.

Barcelona (Spain) to Tangier (Morocco): This is not a popular route, but handy if you want to avoid traveling down to the south of Spain. Grand Navi is the company that operates these ferries. A roundtrip ticket for a single foot passenger in a seat (rather than a berth) costs around 180 Euros. Ferries take 24 hours to get to Morocco and 27 hours on the return trip. There’s usually just one ferry scheduled per day.


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Ferries from Italy and France to Tangier
You can also catch a ferry to Tangier from Italy (Genoa), Gibraltar and France (Sete).

Getting to and from Tangier by Train
If you are planning to take a train to visit Fes or Marrakech, then arriving in Tangier is your best option for rail connections to these destinations. The Tangier train station (Tanger Ville) is about 4km southeast of the ferry port and bus station. Take a petit taxi, make sure the meter is on, to get to and from the train station. More about: Train travel in Morocco and the night train from Tangier to Marrakech.

Getting to and from Tangier by Bus
The main long-distance bus station, CTM, is right outside the ferry port terminal. You can catch buses to all the major towns and cities in Morocco. The buses are comfortable and everyone gets a seat.

Where to Stay in Tangier
Tangier has a wide range of accommodation and places to stay vary from cheap and sleazy, to excellent Riads (boutique hotels in restored mansions). Tangier is not a relaxed place to visit, so finding a good hotel that offers a little respite from the hustle, will really make your visit more enjoyable. Make sure you book your first night in advance, there are plenty of hustlers in Tangier who will offer to show you to a hotel. Below are some recommended hotels in Tangier that reflect my personal taste for intimate, mid-range hotels:

La Tangerina: A lovingly restored boutique hotel, with 10 unique rooms. Its location is in the Kasbah, one of the most upmarket sections of Tangier, situated on a hill overlooking the rest of the city. Enjoy meals on the rooftop terrace, with traditional Moroccan cuisine available for dinner. The Tangerina gets the highest ratings on Tripadvisor for all Tangier hotels. Rates start at 45 Euros per night.
Dar Jameel: If you want to stay in the heart of the medina, Dar Jameel is an excellent choice. This boutique hotel offers 8 unique suites around a central interior courtyard, on 5 levels. Each room is beautifully decorated with traditional Moroccan furniture and crafts. Breakfast is included in the rate. Room rates start at 48 Euros per night.
Dar Nour: Small, boutique hotel located in the Kasbah, convenient to all the major sights. The rooftop terrace is gorgeous, overlooking the town and the ocean in the distance, this is where you eat breakfast. There are 7 unique rooms to choose from, stylishly decorated with authentic Moroccan tile, carpets. and furniture. Rates start at 63 Euros per night, including breakfast.
Dar Nilam: Upscale boutique hotel in Tangier offering personalized service, opulent decor, and pick up from the ferry (a nice touch). The hotel has 5 unique rooms, a small garden, and pool. Dinner is traditional Moroccan fare, breakfast is included in the room rate. The hotel is located a mile from the town center and is close to the beach. Rates start at 80 Euros per night.
When to go to Tangier
The best time to visit Tangier is September to November and March to May. The weather is perfect, not too hot, and the tourist season is not yet in full swing. You also have a better chance at finding room at a nice Riad (see above) for a good price.
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Getting Around Tangier
The best way to get around Tangier is either on foot or in a petit taxi. Make sure the driver uses the meter correctly. Grand taxis are much more expensive and you have to negotiate the rate in advance. Of course, you can always get a personal guide through your hotel (see above), or book a day tour before you get to Tangier.

Coping with Hustlers – “Touts” in Tangier
Tangier is infamous among visitors for its persistent “touts” (hustlers). A Tout is a person who tries to sell you something (a good or a service) in an importuned manner. The minute you get off your ferry or train, you will meet your first “tout.” Follow the advice below and you will have a much better time in Tangier.

Assume Nothing is Free
While hospitable and friendly folk abound in Tangier, be careful when you’re in a touristy area and you’re offered something for “free”. It is rarely free.

Advice on where to buy your train ticket or ferry ticket will be offered by many folks, but just be aware these guys work on commission. You can easily buy your own ticket and fill out your own forms. Be firm and say “no thanks” and look confident. If you really don’t know where to go, then be aware you will end up paying a tip for getting help with directions, no matter how many times the offer is given “for free”.

A “free” guided tour around the Medina will most likely lead to an uncle’s trinket shop or a demand for money at the end of the tour. It may also include shops you are not remotely interested in seeing. A “free” cup of tea might include looking at a lot of carpets.

If you hear the word “free”, the price you pay is often not in your control.

But remember your faux guides are simply people trying to make a living to support their families. While ripping off gullible tourists may not seem like the most honest way to make money, it’s simply a survival tactic and you shouldn’t take it too personally. A firm “no thanks” is the best way to deal with the situation. A little humor also goes a long way.

Hotels Don’t Suddenly Appear
This tip is especially useful for the independent travelers. When you arrive in Tangier, either at the bus station, train station or ferry port you will be greeted by many people, inquiring rather loudly, where you want to go to. Many of these folks will earn a commission for taking you to a hotel of their choosing. This doesn’t mean that the hotel will necessarily be bad, it just means you may end up in an area you don’t want to be in; the price of your room will be higher to cover the commission, or the hotel could indeed be quite nasty.

Hotel touts have figured lots of clever techniques to scare gullible tourists into following them to a hotel they earn commissions from. They may ask you what hotel you have booked and then tell you emphatically that that hotel is full, has moved, or is in a bad area. Some hotel touts will go further and even pretend to call your hotel for you and get a friend on the phone to tell you the hotel is full.

Don’t believe the hype. Make a reservation with a hotel before you arrive, especially if you’re arriving in the evening. Your guidebook will have phone numbers of all hotels they list, or you can research online before you go. Take a taxi and insist they take you to the hotel of your choosing. If your taxi driver pretends not to know the location of your hotel, take another taxi.

It’s better to pay a little more for your first night in Tangier rather than to end up somewhere you don’t want to be.

Avoiding Touts (Hustlers) Altogether
If you wish to avoid a lot of unwanted attention, the best thing to do is take a guided tour of Tangier. You will probably still end up in shops you don’t really wish to see and you won’t go off the beaten track — but if this is your first time in Africa, it may be more enjoyable.

Guided Tours of Tangier
Most hotels will arrange a tour for you as well as tours to nearby attractions and towns outside of Tangier. There are lots of tour agencies near the ferry ports in Spain and Gibraltar that have scheduled day trips on offer. You will be with a group on these tours and that has some advantages and disadvantages. Regardless, checking out tour itineraries will help you figure out what to see iWhat to Wear in Tangier
Long pants or long skirts/dresses are recommended. Women will get a lot of unwanted attention by strolling around Tangier in shorts or a short skirt. Wear t-shirts with 3/4 length sleeves.n Tangier.

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Stay Lean Eating Whatever You Want

The title sounds too good to be true right? Sounds like I’m about to hit you up for the newest, latest, and greatest supplement to just hit the market that will finally deliver the results you want without the strict dietary protocol.

That is not the case here. What I’m about to share with you is the discoveries that I have made throughout a long winding road of studying health and nutrition for a couple of decades now. I’m not going to tell you that the diet I’m about to write about will work for everyone, but I will say that it works for me.

I’m just bummed that I didn’t heed the advice of Ori Hofmekler way back when his book The Warrior Diet first came out. My approach is a little different but I need to give credit where it is due. He was the first guy that I read about who really went against the gospel of eating 5–6 small balanced meals a day, and instead proposed one daily feeding at the end.

It is interesting to note that one of my biggest influences in the past decade has been John Danaher. I was always impressed that he maintained an athletic physique despite being crippled by his leg and back and more surprisingly only eating once per day. John would teach and train all day long at Renzo’s and like clockwork you could swing by whole foods around 8pm and you would find John having his dinner. Usually charming the ladies who sat around him.

Shouldn’t he be skinny from the lack of a steady stream of amino acids? Shouldn’t he be fat from the overload of cortisol, since we wasn’t getting post workout recovery fuel immediately after training 2–3 times per day on an empty stomach? Shouldn’t he have low blood sugar and be unable to perform?

I figured it was because he mostly taught and didn’t train super intense. He just trained a lot. I can circle back on that later, but the man I looked up to for technical advice was actually on to something. I remember when I asked him about how he can eat so little and maintain his energy all day. He told me,”I have always felt that food when overeaten has a toxemic effect on the mind and body.” The writing was on the wall but I didn’t want to lose my hard earned muscle mass and get skinny fat, so I kept doing what I always did. Eat every 3–4 hours a balance of protein, carbs, and fat.

Intermittent fasting has become one of the hot terms in the nutrition world. I think for good reason. I never felt good when I ate a lot. Although I love breakfast food, I have never liked eating breakfast. When I was growing up and still to this day. I liked eating a light lunch and a heavy dinner. It is funny hat I was already doing what I’m doing now back when I was a chubster growing up. Thing is now I know which foods to eat and how to cycle in the junk food. Back then I was just eating all of the wrong stuff and with all the macronutrients mistimed or in the wrong ratios.

So here is what I have personally found to work. I have a lot of self discipline when needed but I also love eating. If I must follow a strict eating plan for life to maintain low body fat then I will quit before I begin. So far this week here is what I have eaten.

Monday: Lunch: 5 Eggs in Paleo Wrap, Mixed Greens Salad, Dinner:12oz Wild Alaskan Salmon, Broccoli with Butter

Tuesday /Gramercy Tavern: Duck liver mousse with Grilled Bread, Meatballs with Collard Greens, Kombucha Squash, 2 Heller Bamburg Beers, Coconut Cream Pie, Cheesecake

Wednesday: 12oz Bison Tenderloin, Mixed Greens with Avocado Dressing

Thursday /ABC Kitchen: 2 IPAs, Pork and Chicken Sausage with Greens and Potato, Akushi Cheeseburger with extra fries dipped in Mayo, Spinach Goat Cheese Pizza, Apple Pie with Ice Cream

Friday / Cosme: 1 Pinkus Pilsner, 1 Dos Equis Amber, Tlayuda, Enmoladas, Uni Tostada, Artic Char Tostada, Short Ribs with Tortillas, Chocolate Cake, Brown Butter Cake.

Almost every morning I have coffee with full cream and a Bio K probiotic. Usually in the afternoon I have a large bone broth. I will usually have an egg and a meatball or two with my broth. One my low carb days I will eat some 80% or higher Dark Chocolate at night time to hold me over from eating anything sweet.

When you look at my menu, you might say holy shit that is a lot of food dude. I would most definitely agree. I do not get cravings at all. I don’t even get hungry until 2 days or so after the last big meal. I know this flies in the face of what most people write about health and fitness, but this really works.

Even when people write about fasting they tend to tell people eat only grassfed meats and monounsaturated fat sources, or perhaps some precise ratio of macronutrients. I’m eating the best quality food at every meal, but I’m not going to tell you that I don’t have any rules. I just make sure everything I eat tastes good and I eat until I’m content. I don’t rush and I don’t force feed myself during my big meals.

The rhythm isn’t exact but I tend to go one day low carb and then the following high carb. If you look at my high carb days the cheat meals are only about 200 grams of carbs. Eating at fine dining establishments the portions are smaller and there are usually substantial veggies with each meal. When you consider that I am having no carbs for about 48 hours and in that timeframe I am training 4–6 hours, that meal is burning off before I even eat it.

There are some real hormonal tricks going on here. The most important is that for a 24–48 hour window between the big meals my insulin levels are quite low since there is little to no carbs coming into the diet. Just protein, fiber, and fat. That makes the body produce more glucagon and makes my cells release energy to burn. Then when I have my big meal my glycogen depleted muscles and liver soak up all of those carbs I am eating like a plant getting rain in the desert. Your body can supposedly store up to 600 grams of carbs in the muscles and liver so 200 grams every other day is a paltry amount.

Now the key is once I stop eating I don’t have anything to eat for at least 16 hours and usually up to 20 hours. I will have my coffee with full cream and a Bio K in the morning, but is mostly fat and a little protein. In the afternoon I usually go for a walk after my morning sessions and get a bone broth with 2 grass fed meatballs. Sometimes I will have a duck egg with that. I switch the broth and meat source but I make my lunch a protein and fat based meal. Again no carbs so my body stays in an energy releasing mode, which means I’m burning off all of that food from the night before.

Then my dinner is a simple fair that I can easily cook at home. Game meat, beef, poultry, fish, or seafood along with fibrous vegetables and plenty of good fats. I like to use olive oil, avocado oil, macadamia nut oil, coconut oil, butter, ghee, cream, lard, tallow, or schmaltz (chicken fat). Fats are our friends and I welcome them onto my plate. If I am still hungry I will have some dark chocolate, almond butter, or coconut butter. Usually a little bit is all it takes to keep me satisfied.

The day of the cheat meal is just like the day before. I have my coffee in the morning. My protein and fat based lunch, and then whatever I want at night. Although I make sure I eat plenty of carbs there are certain rules I follow. Everything has to be from the best sourced ingredients and everything has to taste absolutely amazing. I think life is too short to eat bad food. I don’t force feed myself but I do make sure I leave this meal completely satisfied. Maybe I could be an anatomy chart if I followed strict rules, but I am leaner at 37 than I was at 17 and even 27 when I was fighting professionally. I train less intense than I ever have and I am stronger than I have ever been. I’m still at right around 165 pounds which is my natural bodyweight since I was a teenager.

This style of eating is against most everything I have read throughout my life but it works. I’m not sure it will work for everyone else, but that is why I’m sharing the basics with you. Give it a try and if it works shoot me an email let me know the results. I’m seriously considering writing a book about it so people can understand the hormonal reasoning behind all of this. It’s not just mathematics as some of you might be thinking. It is much more about getting the fat cells to release energy and instead of store energy. It is also about teaching your body to run off fat, the way it is supposed to, and not off sugar, which is the way the food and supplement industries want you to.

It flies in the face of what most of the roided body culture priests expound to their minions. Perhaps they are right and I’m wrong. Perhaps they are being disingenuous. I honestly don’t care and to each their own. You can take this info free of charge and get the physique you want while eating what you want. All that I ask for is an email telling me about your experience at mushinmma@gmail.com.

P.S. Don’t give up on it until you have done this for at least 3 months. You don’t change hormonal patterns overnight.

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One of the many ideas you can do with egg carton!


I started with cutting up the carton and separating it in squares (the part that the egg sits its a a square).


So egg carton can be a bit annoying to cut, make sure you have a strong scissors so it will be comfortable to work.


I cutted them in different sizes, so when I would layer them up and the different layer sizes would give a nice touch, painted with regular acrylic paint and used hot glue to assemble them.

I made five flowers, each one with 3 layers and some loose “petals” coming out of the center of them. I also had an old canvas that I didn’t really liked its previous art, so I painted it again over the old art. 2 or 3 layers of paint should do the job, I did 2.

 

Also use hot glue to attach the flowers on the canvas and a final touch of green.
Hope you like the idea, there are many other things I want to try with it and this was definitely a good first experience!

 

Moroccan 7 vegetables couscous with Tfaya

Moroccan 7 vegetables couscous with Tfaya


Couscous is originally a Berber dish and for this reason couscous is a staple dish in many North African countries. In Morocco, we have different types and versions of couscous but if you mention “couscous” in Morocco, people will usually assume that you are referring to the most basic version of the famous dish: the 7 vegetables couscous.

The 7 vegetables couscous is composed of semolina grains (granules of durum wheat), topped with vegetables and meat cooked in a super tasty and comforting broth.

For a long time, I used to think that couscous was one of these difficult recipes designed only for experienced cooks, and for a long time I didn’t try to make it although I was missing it very much.

A few years ago, my university friends asked me to cook a traditional Moroccan couscous for a dinner party and… I couldn’t say no. Thanks to my mom (who gave me a very detailed recipe), my first couscous was pretty good, there were no leftovers! But I have made it countless times since that day and I have learned a lot. Hopefully you will benefit from that and you will find the recipe as simple as I do today.

The reason I love couscous is because although its cooking time is quite long, its preparation is very quick. You can get the recipe started and do many things by the time the meal is ready to be served.

Couscous is also one of those perfectly balanced and flavoursome dishes that allows you to help yourself two, three (or more?) times and never feel guilty by the end of the meal.

Enjoy, take a look at the notes and feel free to ask questions!


7 VEGETABLES COUSCOUS+ OPTIONAL TFAYA SAUCE (CARAMELISED ONIONS)

Serve 4 to 6

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion chopped (200gr)
  • 600 gr braising beef or lamb (off the bone), trimmed of excess fat. (i.e. lamb shoulder, cracked lamb shank, lamb or beef neck, beef shin). If your meat is on the bone, take into account the weight of the bone and make sure you get about 125 gr of meat per person.
  • 250 gr canned chickpeas (or 125 gr dried chickpeas soaked in cold water overnight), drained.
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Generous pinch of saffron
  • 1 coriander bouquet, tied
  • 2 tomatoes, seeded and chopped in 2 cm large pieces
  • 1 small cabbage (600gr), quartered through the base
  • 1 large sweet potato (250 gr), peeled and cut into large chunks
  • 300 gr turnip, peeled and cut into 3 cm lengths
  • 3 carrots (300 gr), scraped and cut into 4 cm lengths
  • 200 gr courgettes cut into 5 cm lengths (not necessary for baby courgettes)
  • 300 gr butternut squash or pumpkin, seeded if necessary and cut into large chunks
  • 4 cups dried couscous (650 gr)

METHOD

• In a large casserole (minimum 5 litres capacity), heat the olive oil over medium heat and add in the onions, the meat, the spices, salt, pepper and half of the tomato pieces. Turn the meat occasionally until lightly browned, about 10 min.

• Add 1.5 litres of water and the chickpeas. Bring to the boil, reduce to medium low heat and place the coriander bouquet in the casserole. Cover with a lid and let gently simmer for 50 min.

• Prepare the vegetables and set aside.

• Now is a good time to start preparing the raisins and the couscous. The raisin recipe is below and the plain couscous recipe is here. The raisins are optional but if you like sweet and savoury dishes, you will love this addition.

• Carefully discard the coriander bouquet and place the cabbage, turnip and carrots in the broth, cover the casserole with a lid and let it simmer for 35 min. Make sure the vegetables don’t stay at the surface and are well inserted in the broth, otherwise they might not cook evenly.

• Add the potatoes to the broth and cover the casserole for another 20 minutes.

• Meanwhile, place some of the broth (about 6 tablespoons) in a separate casserole or large deep skillet over medium heat and add in the courgettes and butternut pieces. Cover with a lid and cook for 20 minutes until fully cooked. Flip the courgettes and butternut halfway through cooking. The reason why we cook the courgettes and the butternut separately is because once cooked, they become very fragile and they might break if you cook them in the broth with the rest of the vegetables.

• At this stage, your broth and vegetables are ready to be served. Adjust the seasoning by adding salt if necessary.

• Using tongs, carefully remove the meat from the casserole and cut the meat into smaller individual pieces. To serve, place warm couscous grains in a plate and top with meat, vegetables and some tablespoons of the broth to make it moist. Add raisins (optional).

Notes

• As you can see, I used a regular casserole for this recipe as opposed to a couscousiere. In my opinion it saves a lot of time and hassle to cook the broth and the couscous grain separately and there isn’t much difference in the taste. Also, I assume that the majority if you don’t own a couscousiere, it will be too bad not to enjoy Moroccan couscous because of that.

• Keep the meat in large pieces when you place it in the casserole in the beginning of the recipe. Small pieces of meat will get even smaller after hours of slow cooking and you might struggle to find them in the broth once they are cooked. In my opinion,  it’s simpler to cook large pieces of meat and cut them in individual pieces before serving.

• In Morocco, people traditionally season the couscous grains with “smen” when preparing them. Smen is a type of salted fermented butter and has a very distinctive taste. If you like it, use smen instead of olive oil when preparing the couscous grains.

• Feel free to play around with the recipe and add or use different vegetables. Moroccans traditionally use 7 vegetables because “7” is a lucky number in the Moroccan culture.

•  Make sure to insert the vegetables at the right time so the meat and the vegetables will be ready at the same time. The way I calculate the cooking time for the vegetable is very simple. I assume that the meat will take about 2 hours to cook (or more for some cuts). I leave the meat to cook in the broth (with the chickpeas, onions, tomatoes…) until it is time to insert the vegetables so they will be ready at the same time as the meat. Keep in my mind that some vegetables cook faster than others.

• Use quinoa instead of couscous grains for a gluten free version of the 7 vegetables couscous. If you are on a vegetarian diet, omit the meat. If you like, spicy like me, add a teaspoon of harissa to your plate.

• You can keep the couscous grains, the broth, the meat, the vegetables and the raisins for up to 3 days in the fridge.

 

OPTIONAL TFAYA SAUCE (CARAMELISED ONIONS)

Serve 4 to 6

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 large onions (400 gr), chopped
  • 400 gr dark seedless raisins, soaked in warm water for 20 minutes and drained
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 4 tablespoons honey (or sugar)
  • 1 teaspoon salt

METHOD

• Heat the olive oil in a deep skillet over medium heat and place the onions. Cover with a lid and leave the onions until they are soft and translucent, about 10 min. This will allow sweating the onions.

• Uncover and add about 6 tablespoons from the vegetable and meat to the raisins, salt, cinnamon and honey. Leave over low heat and simmer gently until golden brown, about 35 min. Stir occasionally to make sure the onions don’t stick to the bottom of the pan.

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How to make Pompoms fruits

How to make  Pompoms fruits

How to make Strawberry Pompoms

1. Wrap red yarn as a base for the pompom but add a few wraps of white yarn scattered here and there as in the photo to create seeds. Repeat this in random places as you go and build layers.

2. Add a small bunch of green yarn on one end loosely. Make the other half of your pompom in the same way and bring them together so the green parts meet at the same end.

4. For trimming, hold all the green yarn on top together and trim the red part only into a neat ball at first. Now trim the bottom end into a pointy shape to resemble a strawberry.

5. Now flatten the top green yarn and trim some yarns shorter than others, into a star-like shape. You can trim them much shorter if you like, I just like that leafy top of the strawberry so I tried to give some feature there. Keep a few yarns long in the middle as a stem. Yum!

How to make Kiwi Pompoms


I’ve made little diagrams on the top left corners of each image that show the part I’m wrapping in each photo next to it. Hope that helps!

1. Wrap a couple of layers of white yarn covering about 1/3 of the pompom maker in the middle area.

2. Hold a mix of white and black yarn together and wrap on the top for the seeds.

3. Wrap green yarn all over on the top and sides of the seeds, but not all the way to the very edges of the pompom maker. Leave some room on both sides. See the image above.

4. Wrap the brown yarn all over for the outer skin color. This time, cover the entire area of the pompom maker from edge to edge. This is now one half of your kiwi pompom.

5. For the second half, wrap entirely in brown skin color only. Put the two halves together and finish.
When you cut it open, you will have a green kiwi design in the middle surrounded by the brown outer color. Trim the green inner fruit part to make a flat top. To do this place your scissors horizontally on top of it as in the photo above and snip off the fluffy top. Be careful not to trim too close to the yarn that’s tying the whole pompom in the middle. The reason why we wrap extra brown yarn on top of the green in the first half of the pompom is to keep the center of the pompom away from the green part so this doesn’t happen, but it’s still worth checking that you’re not cutting too close to the center as you trim.

Once you’ve trimmed the top quite flat, trim the edges of the green circle to tidy up. Then snip off all the brown yarn sticking out next to the green like the photo above. Trim the rest of the brown yarn on the other side to make a longish kiwi like shape. Done!

How to make a Watermelon Pom Pom

I ended up with a massive pompom for this. I’ve been using a one-size-fits-all cardboard pompom maker for every pompom so far. If I want to make larger pompoms, I try to wrap more yarn. Or conversely wrap less yarn to make smaller pompoms. If you’re interested in tips for making different sized pompoms, I’ll try new methods next time and report the difference.

Ok, so for the watermelon pompom:

1. For the first pompom half, wrap pink yarn and scatter a little wrap of black yarn in random places as you go. Just like the strawberry above. Finish the entire first half of the pompom like this.

2. Now for the second half, start by wrapping a mixture of two green yarns – light and dark – next to each other, to create green stripes on the outer skin. You can cover 3/4 of the pompom maker with this (that’s what I did, see above) or the entire length if you’d like to make a larger green skin area.

3. Wrap a thin layer of white yarn on top of the green.

4. On top of this white layer, wrap the pink color you used in the first pompom half, either with or without the seed parts.

5. So one half of the pompom is entirely pink, the other half is made up of the layers of green, white and pink. As you see in the photo above, finished in pink on top. Put the two halves together and finish.

6. Now it will look like the last image above. Trim it as you like, into a round ball or a wedge with a pointy end as I did. Juicy!

How to Make a Lemon Pom Pom
Again, I added tiny diagrams in the top left corners to show which part is wrapped. Hope this helps!

1. Wrap a thin layer of white first, but not all the way from end to end. As you can see in the diagram and photo, you need to leave some room at both ends.

2. Wrap some yellow yarn like in the picture top right. Fatter on both ends and thinner towards the middle with a gap in the center.

3. Wrap another thin layer of white on top. As you can see, the shape’s narrower in the middle like an hour-glass.

4. Wrap more yellow yarn on top, filling up the narrow middle area.

5. Again, wrap a thin layer of white on top.

6. Now wrap a decent amount of yellow all over. This is your first half of the lemon pompom.

7. For the second half, simply wrap solid yellow color onl

Ta-da! When you open, you will get this yellow rough ball with some white lines going across. As with the kiwi, trim the top side with white lines flat. Keep your scissors flat to the surface and keep trimming.

Gather the edges towards the middle in your hand and trim the white circle edges neatly. Once you’re happy with the flat top, trim the rest of the yellow body into a neater lemon shape.

Ta-da! When you open, you will get this yellow rough ball with some white lines going across. As with the kiwi, trim the top side with white lines flat. Keep your scissors flat to the surface and keep trimming.

Gather the edges towards the middle in your hand and trim the white circle edges neatly. Once you’re happy with the flat top, trim the rest of the yellow body into a neater lemon shape.

for more fruits Pompoms visite this blog

Small fruit pies

Small fruit pies

in this video you will learn how to prepare small fruit pies



shortbread ingredients:

250gfarine
125g butter
60g almond powder
100g icing sugar
1 / 2cac vanilla powder
a pinch of salt
MOUSSLINE CREAM:
50g cream powder pastry
70g caster sugar
4Yellow eggs
500g of milk
150g butter at room temperature
2 bags of vanilla

Chocolate Rolled Cake / كعكة الشوكولا الملفوفة – CookingWithAlia


INGREDIENTS:
Batter:
3 eggs
100 grams almond powder
30 grams flour
80 grams powdered sugar
1 teaspoon honey
3 egg whites
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
20 grams melted butter
Pinch of salt

Chocolate cream:
400 ml whipping cream, cold
150g black chocolate

200 grams apricot jam

DIRECTIONS:
Step 1: Making the batter
1- Preheat the oven to 180°C (356°F).
2- In a bowl, place the eggs, almond powder, flour, icing sugar, and honey and mix with a spatula until smooth.
3- In a ‘bain-marie’, place the bowl and continue mixing until warm.
4- Remove the bowl from the bain-marie, and with a hand mixer, whisk until it doubles in size.
5- In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites with a pinch of salt until it becomes fluffy. Add the granulated sugar and beat until it forms firm peaks.
6- Using a spatula, take about 1 tablespoon of the batter and add it to the egg whites, mix together, then add the mixture to the batter and mix.
7- Place the batter on a baking pan covered with parchment paper, spread the batter evenly with a spatula and smooth its surface.
8- Clean the sides of the baking pan and bake in the preheated oven for 15 minutes.
9- Take the cake out of the oven, remove it from the pan, dust with icing sugar and let cool for a while.

Step 2: Prepare the chocolate cream
1- Melt the chocolate in a ‘bain-marie’ and let it cool down completely before using.
2- In a bowl, use the beater to whip the cream until it thickens with firm peaks. Add the dark chocolate and mix with the beater for a few seconds then switch to a spatula and fold in the mixture until you get a smooth chocolate cream.

Step 3: Roll the cake
1- Cut the cake in a strip of 5 centimeters width, lengthwise.
2- Spread the jam on the cake, then spread a thin layer of chocolate cream.
3- Roll the first strip of cake, then stick its end with another strip and continue rolling. Do the same with a third strip.
4- On a flat plate, place the cake roll, then take the remaining strips and roll them around the cake.
5- Place in the refrigerator for 10 minutes.
6- Cover with the rest of chocolate cream, and decorate with cocoa nibs or shaved chocolate.
7- Refrigerate for at least 2 hours before serving.